PART I

Senior Living in the 21st Century

How U.S. Baby Boomers Will Change the World (for Better or Worse)

The world’s workforce demographics, housing markets, and social dynamics are about to be struck by a tidal wave of change. In this report, we delve into the underlying systems that stand broken, the shifts that are accelerating their reinvention, and the challenges and opportunities they present to the built environment industry — for seniors’ housing and care communities, and beyond.

This report is of interest to:

  • Investors in private equity, real estate, and healthcare
  • Developers of lifestyle/healthcare technology
  • Designers and developers of seniors’ housing and care facilities
  • Retirees and those nearing retirement

Key Terms: RISK, INVESTING, RETIREMENT, AGING, SENIOR HOUSING, COMMUNITY, PLANNING, DESIGN, HEALTHCARE, RECESSION, FINANCIAL SECURITY

Credits:
Dave Gilmore, President & CEO | Rob Hart, Senior Researcher
Chyenne Pastrana, Director of Marketing | Nicole Puckett, Lead Graphic Designer | Beckie Hawk, Web Master


PART ONE: CUMULATIVE SYSTEMIC FRAGILITY

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The world’s population stands at a precipice.

As the baby-boom generation approaches retirement, they’re leaving one stage of life and entering another. From 2011 through 2030, 10,000 Americans will turn 65 each day. All told, some 70 million people will exit the US workforce in less than two decades. Workforce turnover at this scale has never happened in the history of any economy.

But why does this matter for the global community?

It matters because so many global developments converge with this major tipping point, affecting health systems, investment strategy, housing, politics, and the worldwide economy. To understand holistically how U.S. boomer retirement influences these global systems (and vice-versa), let’s examine a few prominent historical trends that shed light on our present moment.

Age Dependency Ratio

The age dependency ratio, which is the ratio of over-65 persons to 18-65 year-old persons in the US, is valuable in part because it reveals the shift in financial support structures.

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